Most Popular Voyeur-Themed Movies

Most Popular Voyeur-Themed Movies

According to the Merriam Webster Dictionary, the term “voyeur” refers to a person who has interests in intimate behaviors of other people such as sexual pleasure or pain. Several films are voyeuristic in nature considering that the producers and filmmakers grant the characters’ perspective to the viewers.

Here are three of the well-received voyeuristic films that emerged and disturbed film viewers over time.

  1. Peeping Tom (1960)

The British psychological horror film in 1960 revolved around the voyeurism and violence of a psychopathic serial killer, Mark Lewis, who films prostitutes with his camera while stabbing them to death. The psychological complexity of Lewis including sadomasochism and sexual crises reflects the traumatic experiences from his childhood.

 

Michael Powell, a well-known filmmaker from fifty-seven years ago, directed Peeping Tom where he became a subject of several controversies due to the theme of the film. Several publications such as The Telegraph, British reviews, Daily Express, and The Monthly Film Bulletin assessed the film as disgusting, nauseating, and depressing. Furthermore, Derek Hill from the Tribune recommended that viewers should flush Peeping Tom down the sewer to properly dispose of the film.

 

Although the film received various commentaries from analysts upon its initial release, some significant filmmakers regarded Peeping Tom as a masterpiece due to the objective and subjective directing approach of Powell.

 

  1. Rear Window (1954)

One of the most popular Hitchcockian films is the 1953 mystery thriller Rear Window which Alfred Hitchcock based on two actual murders in 1910 and 1924. Hitchcock centered the film on Jeff Stewart, the main protagonist with a broken leg in a plaster cast, who spectates on his apartment neighbors from the rear window.

 

The camera angles all throughout the film were mostly inside the apartment, so the viewers saw the neighbors from the voyeuristic perspective of Jeff. Hitchcock received several recognitions from various filmmakers and critics, as well as four Academy Award nominations including Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Color Cinematography, and Best Sound Recording.

 

  1. Blue Velvet (1986)

David Lynch directed and wrote the mystery-thriller psychological film Blue Velvet in 1986 with intense sexual content and raw emotional scenes. The storyline started when two youngsters, Jeffrey Beaumont and Sandy Williams, found a severed human ear behind a hospital. The delicate curiosity of Jeffrey about their discovery led him to the dark side and involvement in a critical drama of a kidnapping incident of the husband and son of the lounge singer, Dorothy Vallens, by the drug-sniffing psychopath, Frank Booth.

 

One of the most unforgettable scenes from Blue Velvet was the time when Jeffrey witnessed the “sadomasochistic” sexual encounter between Vallens and Booth to protect the lives of her husband and son.

 

Blue Velvet received a mixed response from viewers and experts upon its release due to its disturbing and painful contents. However, several publications and film institute such as The American Film Institute, Sight & Sound, Entertainment Weekly, and Time considered Blue Velvet as one of the greatest films in America.

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